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From Oscars Sunday to Monday morning more than 4.5 million conversations occurred about the celebrated awards show. Networked Insights dove head first into the conversations and pulled out the most relevant details for marketers. What the data and analytics company learned: more than the movie-makers and actors, politics, controversy and awkward moments claimed the spotlight.


Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” didn’t win Best Picture, but it won for most conversation. With more than 15.1 percent of the total conversation around Oscar-nominated major movie releases, the racially-charged horror story won for Best Original Screenplay making Peele the first black writer to win this category. “Get Out” was also nominated for Best Picture Best Actor and Best Director. Peele noted in his emotional speech that he stopped and restarted writing the film nearly 20 times because he felt it was too controversial to be picked up and made into a major release.



Peele’s award isn’t just a major win for the former comedy writer, but it’s also a win for the diversity and inclusion movement that kicked off after the #OscarsSoWhite call-out in 2015.


In fact, the issues around gender equality and diversity, in general, were front and center this year.


Films like, “The Shape of Water,” “Lady Bird” and “Get Out” being recognized are an incredible leap into a new direction and audiences celebrated it. Nearly 80 percent felt positive about the awards show with conversations around success claiming 34 percent of conversation and pride claiming 9 percent of the conversation.


But there is still work to do, audiences noted.


Despite the #MeToo movement and #TimesUp pins on lapels or dresses and the heavy continuous audience shots of Gal Gadot, Wonder Woman wasn’t nominated in any category and audiences noticed.

Dear Basketball Featured Image Networked Insights

And they especially noticed when Kobe Bryant won Best Animated Short for “Dear Basketball.” The win, though celebrated by most, was noted by some as awkward. Bryant was accused of sexual assault in 2003 by a hotel employee who ultimately didn’t testify but was awarded an undisclosed sum in a separate civil suit and received a very public apology from Bryant, who admitted to the sexual encounter but denied the assault allegation.


Audiences also picked up on the veteran basketball player’s nod to LeBron James’ recent political comments. When a racial slur was graffitied on James’ Los Angeles home recently, the all-star basketball player spoke openly about being a black athlete in America.


His comments didn’t sit well with Fox News host Laura Ingraham who said the athlete should just “shut up and dribble.” Ingraham said she was not interested in political advice from “someone who gets paid $100 million a year to bounce a ball.”


Bryant mentioned that even though basketball players should just “shut up and dribble” they can do more meaningful work, too.


Finally, Meryl Streep was a major talking point for audiences, this year. But it wasn’t because of her 21 career nominations.  It wasn’t because of her fight for gender equality. And it wasn’t for her push for actor rights, despite the call out in Frances McDormand’s best actress acceptance speech that mentions the need for inclusion rider.


Instead, Streep kept audiences engaged because of shouting. She didn’t win for “The Post” but she claimed more than 10 percent of the total conversation because she was able to offer the internet an updated meme of her cupping her hands around her mouth and yelling.


Meryl Streep meme updated from Oscars 2018

All in all, the awards show brought out tough topics to center stage and audiences appreciated it.

For more insights like this, or to analyze brands or campaigns of your own, get in touch with Networked Insights at, hello@networkedinsights.com or at http://www.networkedinsights.com/contact-us/


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Networked Insights Note: This is the second report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The Olympics didn’t just take the gold, but they smoked NYFW when it came to audience attention.

 

Networked Insights found that the premier fashion event of the year was no match for the premier sporting event of the year. In fact,  only approximately 7 percent of the Olympics conversation. And that’s even after NYFW leveraged the use of celebrity influencers.


Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we explored conversations around New York Fashion Week. Both the Olympics and  NYFW were running concurrently, so the time frame for the search was isolated to Feb. 9 to Feb. 16. In total, there were 310,000 conversations around New York Fashion Week but during the same time frame, there have been more than 4 million conversations around the Olympics.


We were able to isolate the trend drivers for NYFW conversation. The volume incrementally increased, and most notably spiked on February 13, with 74,000 conversations primarily because of these four drivers:


    1. Christian Siriano

    2. Victoria Beckham

    3.  Celebrity Influencers, most notably Kehlani

    4. Cardi B

Key points to notice are three of the four drivers are celebrities who aren’t entirely related to fashion, like designer Christian Siriano. In fact, three are singers and fashion is secondary, though it could be argued that Victoria Beckham is more of a fashion icon these days than anything else.


Typically these three female celebrities are able to reach more than 300,000 people in a single Tweet collectively, and yet their power was no match for the Olympics. So even with the support of celebrity influencers, the luxury event of the year did not drive much engagement when compared to the premier sporting event of the year.

Possible Explanation

 

The audiences for both of these events differ, quite significantly.

 

For the Olympics, the audience is 51 percent male. They share a nearly 3 times greater affinity for the Olympics than the general consumer with the highest affinity for speed skating at 2.78 times the general consumer.

 

Additionally, the Olympics audience shares an interest in business and finance, they’re generally politically active and could be retirees who are also tech enthusiasts. So to reach the Olympics audience, it’s best to also include topics and content that also appeals to these groups of audiences.

 

Now for the NYFW, the audiences are 59 percent female. They share an affinity for fashion shows that is nearly 6 times that of the general consumer. They also share an affinity for film festivals, cosmetic brands, clothing, models and finally when it comes to sports – only tennis.

 

The NYFW audience is composed mostly of fashionistas or millennials or those who fit into Gen Z. Clearly, these audiences are very different from the Olympics. In fact, the Olympics doesn’t even rank on their interests and the closest athletic event that engages this audience is tennis, not a winter sport.

Finally, we found that even though the engagement volume differed, the overall audience feeling toward both the Olympics and New York Fashion Week was positive.

For an opportunity to discover insights like this, get in touch with us at www.networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com.

 

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Networked Insights Note: This is the first report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The fluidity of audience opinion has never been more apparent than when we consider their feelings toward North Korea.

For the first time in at least three months, audience opinion about the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is 60 percent positive; it was 60 percent negative just before the winter games began.

It’s a dramatic shift that audiences believe to be owed almost entirely to the Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un’s actions during the first few days of the PyeongChang Games. Instead of nuclear war, conversations focused on the efforts toward reconciliation.

Winter Olympics 2018 Emotions Shift - Networked Insights


Methodology + Results

Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we analyzed more than 9 million conversations around North Korea that occurred during the last three months. Of those conversations, almost 60 percent of the audience felt negative about the country, with stressful topics, like nuclear war and nuclear threats being discussed in 17 percent of conversations.

Networked Insights Kairos Emotions Search on North Korea

But when Networked Insights isolated the conversations to opening day to February 13, Kairos pulled up more than 1.5 million conversations, and nearly 60 percent of the audience felt positive about North Korea and the Olympics. And instead of stress, 17 percent of the conversations mentioned keywords relating to pride.

Networked Insights Kairos Emotions Search on North Korea, positive
 

This incredible shift in conversation, Networked Insights found, is mostly because of the DPRK’s recent actions.

When former Supreme Leader Kim Jong Il’s only sister, Kim Yo Jong, arrived at the PyeongChang Games straight from Pyongyang and proudly stood behind U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, audiences understood the act to be a sign that warmer relations are on the horizon, at least from the DPRK.

Without speaking, Kim Yo Jong momentarily arrested the power of an athletic gold-medal win. With only a flash of a smile, she completely shifted entrenched opinions of a country riddled with innumerable human rights violations. With only a brief visit to her rival city, standing behind her U.S. adversary, she conveyed the only message DPRK wanted to be heard: we come in peace; you don’t.

As messages of reconciliation and peace dominated the weekend’s visit, Pence remained seated during the opening ceremonies, and audiences spoke out.

Networked Insights sample tweets about DPRK peace talk and reunification

The move aligned with Pence’s no-nonsense approach toward the DPRK, but the choice interfered with the US-backed South Korea’s ultimate desire for reunification and improving inter-Korean relations. Pence also didn’t attend a pre-opening ceremony dinner, where both Moon and Kim were in attendancefurther driving the point that the U.S. is not backing down, to the chagrin of South Koreans.

Audiences caught-on to the should-be Olympic sport of political charades and most didn’t support, however, there were plenty (more than 40 percent) who were vocal about the “obvious attempts at propaganda.”


One Tweeter wrote, “The media praising North Korea and their Olympic appearance is sickening. You’re essentially saying you support Kim Jong-Un (sic) and his regime.” 

Another, like Jake Tapper, took the moment to re-educate the supportive public about the crimes against humanity.

Negative audience conversations about DPRK and the Olympics

Even so, just as the North Korean cheerleaders ignited shock and awe as they rallied with bright smiles throughout the first-ever joint North and South Korean women’s hockey team, Kim Jong Un’s choices were a win for attention.


For more research like this or to understand other ways that Networked Insights can provide data and analysis for you or your brand, get in touch at networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com. 

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UPDATE 1/29/17:
Well, once again we’re proven that the social space isn’t a perfect science. The people may have spoken, but they weren’t getting their wishes granted. Half of the artists that the people picked were correct though, so they weren’t entirely off. 

For a quick run through, check out the actual winners listed below: 
Record of the Year – 24K Magic, Bruno Mars
Album of the Year – 24K Magic, Bruno Mars
Best New Artist – Alessia Cara, nice work social-sphere!
Best Rock Song – Run, Foo Fighters
Best Dance Recording – Tonite, LCD Soundsystem 
Best Country Song – Broken Halos, Mike Henderson + Chris Stapleton
Best Rap Song – Humble, Kendrick Lamar, nice work social-sphere!
Best Alternative Music Album  – Sleep Well Beast, The National, nice work social-sphere!
Best Solo Pop Performance – Shape of You, Ed Sheeran
Best Pop Duo/Group Performance – Feel it Still, Portugal. The Man
Best Pop Vocal Album, Divide, Ed Sheeran 


ORIGINAL POST 1/26/17:

Music lovers are not shy of speaking their mind, especially on the social space. So we put our own thing down, flipped it and reversed it (clearly missing Missy Elliot this year) using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, and discovered who social users think will win big at the 60th annual Grammy’s on Sunday. Check out the infographic below for the category and the winners. 

Also, check back on Sunday as we put our predictions to the test. For more details on how to examine your brand, get in touch with us at hello@networkedinsights.com.

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Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine, Kairos, and our audience marketing platform, audience.ai, to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: This globe doesn’t foster life, but it engages, entertains and rewards itself with gold).

Predictions Schmedictions…unless they’re ours

On Sunday glam and glory will grace televisions sets across the country. Winners will be named, speeches will run too long and losers will be voted on stage by a real-time petition initiated by Kanye West (not really, but maybe). That’s right, we’re talking about the 75th annual Golden Globes. 

But for viewers and those in the social sphere, Sunday is too far away. So, instead, they’re discussing their choices for winners and losers and are using the social space as their platform. While it’s easy to dismiss their chatter as just inaccurate prognostication, we’ve discovered their conversations layered with our machine learning and A.I. actually proves to be mostly accurate – like the time we found the people to have correctly predicted that the Cubs would win the World Series and the election. 

So who and what have viewers pegged to  bask in award greatness this year? We looked at the top nine categories, check them out below: 


Viewers also discussed some surprise over Get Out being lumped in with the comedy and musical category, but they’re excited it’s being considered. They were also pleasantly surprised about the James Franco pick, which stems from a parody of the cult classic, The Room. 

To some viewers, Dunkirk is on the same level, if not exceeded by the Shape of Water, even though predictions say Dunkirk is the projected winner. We will have to hold on for Sunday, when we find out for certain. 

Finally, viewers expressed frustration about Christopher Nolan being the favorite for Best Director as they feel that  Guillermo Del Toro should at least be nominated and considered. 

We’re ready to find out the truth and will be keeping a lucky rabbit’s foot close. Just kidding. We don’t need that, we have Kairos. 

To discover more insights about tools and how they can help you, get in touch with Networked Insights at, hello@networkedinsights.com and www.networkedinsights.com.
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Friends, colleagues and clients: I am pleased to announce that Networked Insights is joining forces with American Family Insurance. As a third-generation entrepreneur, I could not be more gratified. Today reminds me of my dad’s favorite quote from Calvin Coolidge: “persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.” For 11 years we persisted and to all of you who supported us on this journey, I am so very thankful. We couldn’t have done it without you. We’ve been fortunate to have amazing clients and a dedicated and talented team who have helped us create powerful tools that make marketing lives better. To that end, I want to assure you that Kairos, Audience.ai and our industry solutions like MovieSense will remain available. We are not going anywhere. We will simply have more resources to continue building products that delight and change the world. Both NI and American Family Insurance (AFI) share a vision of how organizations help and serve consumers by building machine learning and artificial intelligence (A.I) capabilities and strategies to continue disrupting the standard way of doing things. Our bond is strong. They’ve not only been a client, but a continued minority investor beginning with our Series C round of funding, and in every round since. We were privileged to call them our colleagues, and now proud to call them our friends. Eleven years ago we began our quest with the idea that there had to be a better and faster way to get holistic insights about current or potential customers. A mere six weeks before we launched, Twitter was born and Facebook had decided to move beyond college and high school campuses. So, we had a good hunch that consumers had something to say and the data world was going to be a good place to start.   We can proudly say, we were correct. From here, the possibilities are infinite and we are only just getting started. Trust us when we say, we will still be the same Networked Insights that you have grown to love. Our mission to drive relevant change and provide you with the right audience and the right content to gain the right results remains. We are excited to share more about what we’ll be working on together in the coming months, so stay tuned! In the meantime, you can learn more here in our joint press release. Onwards. Dan Neely, Founder
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Insights and Infographics, Reports & Guides
Understanding social is hard. It’s really that simple. Even analytics organizations who make it their business, literally, to understand what companies within the space can offer brands or marketers, struggle with drawing the lines. In fact, respected analytics organizations, like Forrester, weren’t able to place Networked Insights in a way that was all-encompassing. Perhaps that’s due to the rapid pace Networked Insights is developing and releasing new products and capabilities. After all, shifting a model built for consulting to SaaS is not an easy feat. Or maybe it’s just as simple as accepting that the space is complicated and needs a regular, high-level reset to ensure we’re all speaking the same language. So, to demystify the social space, to better understand where Networked Insights fits within the space and to demonstrate how this applies to brands and marketers, we’ve created the ultimate atlas of the terminology used when speaking about the social sphere. The fifteen common terms as we think about them at Networked Insights are detailed below.  Check it out and get in touch if you see a way we can help you: www.networkedinsights.com. SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING The practice of using social technology platforms to track, gather and mine the information and data of certain individuals or groups (like, companies or organizations), to assess their reputation and discern how they are perceived online and then react to it. This requires you to know what to look for while searching. This is the most common way companies offer reputation management for brands or clients.  SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING TOOL Industry recognized platform that provides monitoring of owned and earned engagement around brand and/or campaigns while also providing analytics,  monitoring, listening and/or intelligence for the user.  SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING  The practice of using a social technology platform to proactively discover what is being said in online, or social, conversations about you, your competitors or your brand in an effort to learn, question, explore and derive insights. This also requires you to know what to look for while searching. SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING TOOL A platform that provides the ability to collect online conversations based upon user-specified terms. The tool is also able to provide some degree of contextual information through the analytics of those conversations.  SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYTICS The approach of collecting data from social sources and evaluating the data to make business decisions. The process steps beyond basic tracking like, retweets or “likes” to develop an in-depth, holistic understanding of the content resonating with consumers.  SOCIAL MEDIA INTELLIGENCE The collective tools and solutions that allow organizations to monitor/listen to social channels and conversations, respond to social signals and synthesize social data points into meaningful trends and analysis based upon the user’s needs. Intelligence can be gathered from both intrusive and non-intrusive means, like open and closed social networks (Wikipedia).  SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT The monitoring, planning and organizing of social content for publishing and analysis. This includes owned and earned social media that focus on engaging consumers, building an online presence and/or reputation management. ENGAGEMENT  The process of interacting with and researching social media users to achieve set goals including, brand management, brand recognition, customer service, support or sales. INFLUENCER A social media user who carries a lot of social clout since his/her opinions can affect the perceptions of a brand and/or subject. Oftentimes influencers are ranked on their ability to cause an impact, like their follower count or the degree of which their statements are being read/shared/valued. SENTIMENT ANALYSIS  Sentiment scoring is the industry standard way that social intelligence companies measure overall positivity or negativity of conversation. By weighting keywords as positive or negative, the overall score of a post is calculated. INSIGHTS (ACTIONABLE INSIGHTS) Taking raw data and making it actionable in order to help brands/marketers make more strategic decisions. CUSTOMER INTELLIGENCE  The qualitative and quantitative insights about consumers.  POTENTIAL REACH  The number of monthly active  people on social platforms, both networking and engagement that matches  the audience you defined through your audience targeting selections. SOCIAL MEDIA AUDIENCE SEGMENTATION  The process of organizing audiences using public social data to derive insights and set for for targeting purposes. EMOTIONS Essentially, sentiment is black-and-white, but Networked Insights’ unique classification system allows us to measure each post, tweet and comment against a full range of emotional classifiers (46 to be exact). This allows marketers to see the full spectrum of consumers’ emotional responses to their brands, campaigns and various marketing efforts. BONUS GRAPHIC: THE SOCIAL SPACE + NETWORKED INSIGHTS Prefer visuals? So do we. Now that we’ve broken down the definitions, get to know how Networked Insights compares to the other major players in the space. One of the unique differentiators of NI is the ability to use social and non-social data for both analytics and targeting or activation. The other is simply in the methodology and mindset we use when creating products, which is best summed up by Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely: “We are about people and what’s important to them in their lives, versus posts, which is understanding what’s important to you in your search.” Read more about our CEO’s perspective on social and what that means to Networked Insights here. Check out the graphic, explore the space, and get in touch if you have any questions or want to learn more at hello@networkedinsights.com or www.networkedinsights.com. Networked Insights and the Social Space Infographic

Keep the definitions handy, download the full report here: 

 

 
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Dudes donning President Trump gear while munching on Reese’s, that was Halloween 2017 in a nutshell. Using the analytics engine Kairos, Networked Insights discovered the specific brands, celebrities and conversation topics that dominated Halloween this year and last year. Most surprising, the holiday isn’t just for kids—women actually dominate within the social sphere. And perhaps unsurprisingly, political costumes remained in the top five. Here’s what else Networked Insights found out: Last year, women were 1.38 times more likely to talk about Halloween costumes than men. They also represented 58 percent of all conversations about the candy-coated holiday. However this year, women had just 55 percent of all conversations about Halloween while men had about 45 percent. That means women wrote more than 200,000 more Halloween-related posts than men this year. And what were they talking about? Their makeup and the excitement about their costumes, specifically Cleopatra this year (and Harley Quinn last year). The popularity for President Trump may be waning in reality, but it was winning during Halloween.   Men, like last year, dressed up as The Don—moving President Trump from the second most popular costume in 2016, for men, to first place this year. But the the greatest upset from last year to this year was in candy. From reigning champion in 2016 to last place in 2017, Twix made the biggest move. Dropping to fifth most popular candy, by huge margins, Reese’s pulled to the top after being in second place last year. It is possible this upset is not directly related to a preference of peanut butter over caramel, but rather to a false rumor about the makers of Reese’s discontinuing the candy. Finally, for kids, Elsa remains a common costume choice despite its 2013 release. Check out the infographics for more: To learn more about Networked Insights, check out: www.networkedinsights.com.
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Dudes donning President Trump gear while munching on Reese’s, that was Halloween 2017 in a nutshell.

Using the analytics engine Kairos, Networked Insights discovered the specific brands, celebrities and conversation topics that dominated Halloween this year and last year. Most surprising, the holiday isn’t just for kids, women actually dominate within the social sphere. And perhaps unsurprisingly, political costumes remained in the top five.

Here’s what else Networked Insights found out:

Last year, women were 1.38 times more likely to talk about Halloween costumes than men. They also represented 58 percent of all conversations about the candy-coated holiday. However this year, women had just 55 percent of all conversations about Halloween while men had about 45 percent. That means women wrote more than 200,000 more Halloween-related posts than men this year.

And what were they talking about? Their makeup and the excitement about their costumes, specifically Cleopatra this year (and Harley Quinn last year).

The popularity for President Trump may be waning in reality, but it was winning during Halloween. Men, like last year, dressed up as The Don, moving President Trump from the second most popular costume in 2016, for men, to first place this year.

But the greatest upset from last year to this year was in candy.

From reigning champion in 2016 to the last place in 2017, Twix made the biggest move. Dropping to fifth most popular candy, by huge margins, Reese’s pulled to the top after being in second place last year. It is possible this upset is not directly related to a preference of peanut butter over caramel, but rather to a false rumor about the makers of Reese’s discontinuing the candy.

Finally, for kids, Elsa remains a common costume choice despite its 2013 release.

Check out the infographics for more:


To learn more about Networked Insights, check out: www.networkedinsights.com.
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Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: C is confusion, concern and a luxury brand now by another name).

Loyalists Up in Arms

Sadness, anger, pride, confusion, and love—one brand and so many emotions.



Coach, a luxury fashion brand, announced its corporate name change to Tapestry on Wednesday. It’s a move that caused a flurry of social media commentary, each post offering a little more clarity or opinion than the last.

Using Kairos, we discovered which emotions were most present in the conversations around the brand name change, and why.

Turns out, Coach brand loyalists aren’t pleased. Sadness and anger held the highest share of the voice, our research found even though the iconic “C” is here to stay.

Sadness, which includes being upset, disliking and disappointment in its category determined by Networked Insights, carried the most weight in the conversation about Coach. The 76-year old iconic brand added Kate Spade to its respected collection of designers, which also includes Stuart Weitzman.



Last year, Coach purchased Stuart Weitzman, and recently acquired Kate Spade, too. The brand has said they changed the corporate name of their company to represent their new direction.

As Victor Luis, chief executive told the New York Times:

“We searched for a name to reflect these values while also expressing the cultural diversity of our people and our brands for today and tomorrow,” Luis said. “In Tapestry, we found a name that speaks to creativity, craftsmanship, authenticity and inclusivity on a shared platform and values. As such, we believe that Tapestry can grow with our portfolio and with our current brands as they extend into new categories and markets.”

But that didn’t mean shoppers were going to accept it. Some stated they felt the name wasn’t strong enough to represent the brand they love.

“Tapestry is a terrible name. Sounds like something you’d find at Hallmark Gold Crown store right next to (shudder) Vera Bradley,” one Twitter user wrote, causing a flurry of shares and retweets.



Andrea Wasserman, a respected executive in the retail industry of Nordstrom fame, wanted a better reason for the name change since the Coach brand is so well loved.



Finally, others were concerned their collection of “C” adorned purses, shoes and clothing would suddenly lose value. Fair considering the stock name change and unaccepted announcement caused the brand’s listed shares dropped 3 percent, knocking $320 million off its market value.

Despite the virtual brand-focused vitriol, some came out to clarify that the beloved “C” logo isn’t going away.



Also, they pointed out that even though the corporate name will be Tapestry, it will not impact the designs of their now three brands – Coach, Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman. That said, what this will all mean once it hits market at the end of the month, time can only tell.

To learn more about how you can also explore conversations about brands, get in touch with Networked Insights at: networkedinsights.com
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