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Networked Insights Note: This is the second report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The Olympics didn’t just take the gold, but they smoked NYFW when it came to audience attention.

 

Networked Insights found that the premier fashion event of the year was no match for the premier sporting event of the year. In fact,  only approximately 7 percent of the Olympics conversation. And that’s even after NYFW leveraged the use of celebrity influencers.


Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we explored conversations around New York Fashion Week. Both the Olympics and  NYFW were running concurrently, so the time frame for the search was isolated to Feb. 9 to Feb. 16. In total, there were 310,000 conversations around New York Fashion Week but during the same time frame, there have been more than 4 million conversations around the Olympics.


We were able to isolate the trend drivers for NYFW conversation. The volume incrementally increased, and most notably spiked on February 13, with 74,000 conversations primarily because of these four drivers:


    1. Christian Siriano

    2. Victoria Beckham

    3.  Celebrity Influencers, most notably Kehlani

    4. Cardi B

Key points to notice are three of the four drivers are celebrities who aren’t entirely related to fashion, like designer Christian Siriano. In fact, three are singers and fashion is secondary, though it could be argued that Victoria Beckham is more of a fashion icon these days than anything else.


Typically these three female celebrities are able to reach more than 300,000 people in a single Tweet collectively, and yet their power was no match for the Olympics. So even with the support of celebrity influencers, the luxury event of the year did not drive much engagement when compared to the premier sporting event of the year.

Possible Explanation

 

The audiences for both of these events differ, quite significantly.

 

For the Olympics, the audience is 51 percent male. They share a nearly 3 times greater affinity for the Olympics than the general consumer with the highest affinity for speed skating at 2.78 times the general consumer.

 

Additionally, the Olympics audience shares an interest in business and finance, they’re generally politically active and could be retirees who are also tech enthusiasts. So to reach the Olympics audience, it’s best to also include topics and content that also appeals to these groups of audiences.

 

Now for the NYFW, the audiences are 59 percent female. They share an affinity for fashion shows that is nearly 6 times that of the general consumer. They also share an affinity for film festivals, cosmetic brands, clothing, models and finally when it comes to sports – only tennis.

 

The NYFW audience is composed mostly of fashionistas or millennials or those who fit into Gen Z. Clearly, these audiences are very different from the Olympics. In fact, the Olympics doesn’t even rank on their interests and the closest athletic event that engages this audience is tennis, not a winter sport.

Finally, we found that even though the engagement volume differed, the overall audience feeling toward both the Olympics and New York Fashion Week was positive.

For an opportunity to discover insights like this, get in touch with us at www.networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com.

 

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Networked Insights Note: This is the first report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The fluidity of audience opinion has never been more apparent than when we consider their feelings toward North Korea.

For the first time in at least three months, audience opinion about the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is 60 percent positive; it was 60 percent negative just before the winter games began.

It’s a dramatic shift that audiences believe to be owed almost entirely to the Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un’s actions during the first few days of the PyeongChang Games. Instead of nuclear war, conversations focused on the efforts toward reconciliation.

Winter Olympics 2018 Emotions Shift - Networked Insights


Methodology + Results

Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we analyzed more than 9 million conversations around North Korea that occurred during the last three months. Of those conversations, almost 60 percent of the audience felt negative about the country, with stressful topics, like nuclear war and nuclear threats being discussed in 17 percent of conversations.

Networked Insights Kairos Emotions Search on North Korea

But when Networked Insights isolated the conversations to opening day to February 13, Kairos pulled up more than 1.5 million conversations, and nearly 60 percent of the audience felt positive about North Korea and the Olympics. And instead of stress, 17 percent of the conversations mentioned keywords relating to pride.

Networked Insights Kairos Emotions Search on North Korea, positive
 

This incredible shift in conversation, Networked Insights found, is mostly because of the DPRK’s recent actions.

When former Supreme Leader Kim Jong Il’s only sister, Kim Yo Jong, arrived at the PyeongChang Games straight from Pyongyang and proudly stood behind U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, audiences understood the act to be a sign that warmer relations are on the horizon, at least from the DPRK.

Without speaking, Kim Yo Jong momentarily arrested the power of an athletic gold-medal win. With only a flash of a smile, she completely shifted entrenched opinions of a country riddled with innumerable human rights violations. With only a brief visit to her rival city, standing behind her U.S. adversary, she conveyed the only message DPRK wanted to be heard: we come in peace; you don’t.

As messages of reconciliation and peace dominated the weekend’s visit, Pence remained seated during the opening ceremonies, and audiences spoke out.

Networked Insights sample tweets about DPRK peace talk and reunification

The move aligned with Pence’s no-nonsense approach toward the DPRK, but the choice interfered with the US-backed South Korea’s ultimate desire for reunification and improving inter-Korean relations. Pence also didn’t attend a pre-opening ceremony dinner, where both Moon and Kim were in attendancefurther driving the point that the U.S. is not backing down, to the chagrin of South Koreans.

Audiences caught-on to the should-be Olympic sport of political charades and most didn’t support, however, there were plenty (more than 40 percent) who were vocal about the “obvious attempts at propaganda.”


One Tweeter wrote, “The media praising North Korea and their Olympic appearance is sickening. You’re essentially saying you support Kim Jong-Un (sic) and his regime.” 

Another, like Jake Tapper, took the moment to re-educate the supportive public about the crimes against humanity.

Negative audience conversations about DPRK and the Olympics

Even so, just as the North Korean cheerleaders ignited shock and awe as they rallied with bright smiles throughout the first-ever joint North and South Korean women’s hockey team, Kim Jong Un’s choices were a win for attention.


For more research like this or to understand other ways that Networked Insights can provide data and analysis for you or your brand, get in touch at networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com. 

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UPDATE 1/29/17:
Well, once again we’re proven that the social space isn’t a perfect science. The people may have spoken, but they weren’t getting their wishes granted. Half of the artists that the people picked were correct though, so they weren’t entirely off. 

For a quick run through, check out the actual winners listed below: 
Record of the Year – 24K Magic, Bruno Mars
Album of the Year – 24K Magic, Bruno Mars
Best New Artist – Alessia Cara, nice work social-sphere!
Best Rock Song – Run, Foo Fighters
Best Dance Recording – Tonite, LCD Soundsystem 
Best Country Song – Broken Halos, Mike Henderson + Chris Stapleton
Best Rap Song – Humble, Kendrick Lamar, nice work social-sphere!
Best Alternative Music Album  – Sleep Well Beast, The National, nice work social-sphere!
Best Solo Pop Performance – Shape of You, Ed Sheeran
Best Pop Duo/Group Performance – Feel it Still, Portugal. The Man
Best Pop Vocal Album, Divide, Ed Sheeran 


ORIGINAL POST 1/26/17:

Music lovers are not shy of speaking their mind, especially on the social space. So we put our own thing down, flipped it and reversed it (clearly missing Missy Elliot this year) using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, and discovered who social users think will win big at the 60th annual Grammy’s on Sunday. Check out the infographic below for the category and the winners. 

Also, check back on Sunday as we put our predictions to the test. For more details on how to examine your brand, get in touch with us at hello@networkedinsights.com.

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Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine, Kairos, and our audience marketing platform, audience.ai, to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: This globe doesn’t foster life, but it engages, entertains and rewards itself with gold).

Predictions Schmedictions…unless they’re ours

On Sunday glam and glory will grace televisions sets across the country. Winners will be named, speeches will run too long and losers will be voted on stage by a real-time petition initiated by Kanye West (not really, but maybe). That’s right, we’re talking about the 75th annual Golden Globes. 

But for viewers and those in the social sphere, Sunday is too far away. So, instead, they’re discussing their choices for winners and losers and are using the social space as their platform. While it’s easy to dismiss their chatter as just inaccurate prognostication, we’ve discovered their conversations layered with our machine learning and A.I. actually proves to be mostly accurate – like the time we found the people to have correctly predicted that the Cubs would win the World Series and the election. 

So who and what have viewers pegged to  bask in award greatness this year? We looked at the top nine categories, check them out below: 


Viewers also discussed some surprise over Get Out being lumped in with the comedy and musical category, but they’re excited it’s being considered. They were also pleasantly surprised about the James Franco pick, which stems from a parody of the cult classic, The Room. 

To some viewers, Dunkirk is on the same level, if not exceeded by the Shape of Water, even though predictions say Dunkirk is the projected winner. We will have to hold on for Sunday, when we find out for certain. 

Finally, viewers expressed frustration about Christopher Nolan being the favorite for Best Director as they feel that  Guillermo Del Toro should at least be nominated and considered. 

We’re ready to find out the truth and will be keeping a lucky rabbit’s foot close. Just kidding. We don’t need that, we have Kairos. 

To discover more insights about tools and how they can help you, get in touch with Networked Insights at, hello@networkedinsights.com and www.networkedinsights.com.
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Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: C is confusion, concern and a luxury brand now by another name).

Loyalists Up in Arms

Sadness, anger, pride, confusion, and love—one brand and so many emotions.



Coach, a luxury fashion brand, announced its corporate name change to Tapestry on Wednesday. It’s a move that caused a flurry of social media commentary, each post offering a little more clarity or opinion than the last.

Using Kairos, we discovered which emotions were most present in the conversations around the brand name change, and why.

Turns out, Coach brand loyalists aren’t pleased. Sadness and anger held the highest share of the voice, our research found even though the iconic “C” is here to stay.

Sadness, which includes being upset, disliking and disappointment in its category determined by Networked Insights, carried the most weight in the conversation about Coach. The 76-year old iconic brand added Kate Spade to its respected collection of designers, which also includes Stuart Weitzman.



Last year, Coach purchased Stuart Weitzman, and recently acquired Kate Spade, too. The brand has said they changed the corporate name of their company to represent their new direction.

As Victor Luis, chief executive told the New York Times:

“We searched for a name to reflect these values while also expressing the cultural diversity of our people and our brands for today and tomorrow,” Luis said. “In Tapestry, we found a name that speaks to creativity, craftsmanship, authenticity and inclusivity on a shared platform and values. As such, we believe that Tapestry can grow with our portfolio and with our current brands as they extend into new categories and markets.”

But that didn’t mean shoppers were going to accept it. Some stated they felt the name wasn’t strong enough to represent the brand they love.

“Tapestry is a terrible name. Sounds like something you’d find at Hallmark Gold Crown store right next to (shudder) Vera Bradley,” one Twitter user wrote, causing a flurry of shares and retweets.



Andrea Wasserman, a respected executive in the retail industry of Nordstrom fame, wanted a better reason for the name change since the Coach brand is so well loved.



Finally, others were concerned their collection of “C” adorned purses, shoes and clothing would suddenly lose value. Fair considering the stock name change and unaccepted announcement caused the brand’s listed shares dropped 3 percent, knocking $320 million off its market value.

Despite the virtual brand-focused vitriol, some came out to clarify that the beloved “C” logo isn’t going away.



Also, they pointed out that even though the corporate name will be Tapestry, it will not impact the designs of their now three brands – Coach, Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman. That said, what this will all mean once it hits market at the end of the month, time can only tell.

To learn more about how you can also explore conversations about brands, get in touch with Networked Insights at: networkedinsights.com
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