SEARCH
SHOP
  • Your Cart Is Empty!
Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
Blog

Networked Insights Note: This is the second report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The Olympics didn’t just take the gold, but they smoked NYFW when it came to audience attention.

 

Networked Insights found that the premier fashion event of the year was no match for the premier sporting event of the year. In fact,  only approximately 7 percent of the Olympics conversation. And that’s even after NYFW leveraged the use of celebrity influencers.


Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we explored conversations around New York Fashion Week. Both the Olympics and  NYFW were running concurrently, so the time frame for the search was isolated to Feb. 9 to Feb. 16. In total, there were 310,000 conversations around New York Fashion Week but during the same time frame, there have been more than 4 million conversations around the Olympics.


We were able to isolate the trend drivers for NYFW conversation. The volume incrementally increased, and most notably spiked on February 13, with 74,000 conversations primarily because of these four drivers:


    1. Christian Siriano

    2. Victoria Beckham

    3.  Celebrity Influencers, most notably Kehlani

    4. Cardi B

Key points to notice are three of the four drivers are celebrities who aren’t entirely related to fashion, like designer Christian Siriano. In fact, three are singers and fashion is secondary, though it could be argued that Victoria Beckham is more of a fashion icon these days than anything else.


Typically these three female celebrities are able to reach more than 300,000 people in a single Tweet collectively, and yet their power was no match for the Olympics. So even with the support of celebrity influencers, the luxury event of the year did not drive much engagement when compared to the premier sporting event of the year.

Possible Explanation

 

The audiences for both of these events differ, quite significantly.

 

For the Olympics, the audience is 51 percent male. They share a nearly 3 times greater affinity for the Olympics than the general consumer with the highest affinity for speed skating at 2.78 times the general consumer.

 

Additionally, the Olympics audience shares an interest in business and finance, they’re generally politically active and could be retirees who are also tech enthusiasts. So to reach the Olympics audience, it’s best to also include topics and content that also appeals to these groups of audiences.

 

Now for the NYFW, the audiences are 59 percent female. They share an affinity for fashion shows that is nearly 6 times that of the general consumer. They also share an affinity for film festivals, cosmetic brands, clothing, models and finally when it comes to sports – only tennis.

 

The NYFW audience is composed mostly of fashionistas or millennials or those who fit into Gen Z. Clearly, these audiences are very different from the Olympics. In fact, the Olympics doesn’t even rank on their interests and the closest athletic event that engages this audience is tennis, not a winter sport.

Finally, we found that even though the engagement volume differed, the overall audience feeling toward both the Olympics and New York Fashion Week was positive.

For an opportunity to discover insights like this, get in touch with us at www.networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com.

 

0

Insights and Infographics, Reports & Guides
Understanding social is hard. It’s really that simple. Even analytics organizations who make it their business, literally, to understand what companies within the space can offer brands or marketers, struggle with drawing the lines. In fact, respected analytics organizations, like Forrester, weren’t able to place Networked Insights in a way that was all-encompassing. Perhaps that’s due to the rapid pace Networked Insights is developing and releasing new products and capabilities. After all, shifting a model built for consulting to SaaS is not an easy feat. Or maybe it’s just as simple as accepting that the space is complicated and needs a regular, high-level reset to ensure we’re all speaking the same language. So, to demystify the social space, to better understand where Networked Insights fits within the space and to demonstrate how this applies to brands and marketers, we’ve created the ultimate atlas of the terminology used when speaking about the social sphere. The fifteen common terms as we think about them at Networked Insights are detailed below.  Check it out and get in touch if you see a way we can help you: www.networkedinsights.com. SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING The practice of using social technology platforms to track, gather and mine the information and data of certain individuals or groups (like, companies or organizations), to assess their reputation and discern how they are perceived online and then react to it. This requires you to know what to look for while searching. This is the most common way companies offer reputation management for brands or clients.  SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING TOOL Industry recognized platform that provides monitoring of owned and earned engagement around brand and/or campaigns while also providing analytics,  monitoring, listening and/or intelligence for the user.  SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING  The practice of using a social technology platform to proactively discover what is being said in online, or social, conversations about you, your competitors or your brand in an effort to learn, question, explore and derive insights. This also requires you to know what to look for while searching. SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING TOOL A platform that provides the ability to collect online conversations based upon user-specified terms. The tool is also able to provide some degree of contextual information through the analytics of those conversations.  SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYTICS The approach of collecting data from social sources and evaluating the data to make business decisions. The process steps beyond basic tracking like, retweets or “likes” to develop an in-depth, holistic understanding of the content resonating with consumers.  SOCIAL MEDIA INTELLIGENCE The collective tools and solutions that allow organizations to monitor/listen to social channels and conversations, respond to social signals and synthesize social data points into meaningful trends and analysis based upon the user’s needs. Intelligence can be gathered from both intrusive and non-intrusive means, like open and closed social networks (Wikipedia).  SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT The monitoring, planning and organizing of social content for publishing and analysis. This includes owned and earned social media that focus on engaging consumers, building an online presence and/or reputation management. ENGAGEMENT  The process of interacting with and researching social media users to achieve set goals including, brand management, brand recognition, customer service, support or sales. INFLUENCER A social media user who carries a lot of social clout since his/her opinions can affect the perceptions of a brand and/or subject. Oftentimes influencers are ranked on their ability to cause an impact, like their follower count or the degree of which their statements are being read/shared/valued. SENTIMENT ANALYSIS  Sentiment scoring is the industry standard way that social intelligence companies measure overall positivity or negativity of conversation. By weighting keywords as positive or negative, the overall score of a post is calculated. INSIGHTS (ACTIONABLE INSIGHTS) Taking raw data and making it actionable in order to help brands/marketers make more strategic decisions. CUSTOMER INTELLIGENCE  The qualitative and quantitative insights about consumers.  POTENTIAL REACH  The number of monthly active  people on social platforms, both networking and engagement that matches  the audience you defined through your audience targeting selections. SOCIAL MEDIA AUDIENCE SEGMENTATION  The process of organizing audiences using public social data to derive insights and set for for targeting purposes. EMOTIONS Essentially, sentiment is black-and-white, but Networked Insights’ unique classification system allows us to measure each post, tweet and comment against a full range of emotional classifiers (46 to be exact). This allows marketers to see the full spectrum of consumers’ emotional responses to their brands, campaigns and various marketing efforts. BONUS GRAPHIC: THE SOCIAL SPACE + NETWORKED INSIGHTS Prefer visuals? So do we. Now that we’ve broken down the definitions, get to know how Networked Insights compares to the other major players in the space. One of the unique differentiators of NI is the ability to use social and non-social data for both analytics and targeting or activation. The other is simply in the methodology and mindset we use when creating products, which is best summed up by Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely: “We are about people and what’s important to them in their lives, versus posts, which is understanding what’s important to you in your search.” Read more about our CEO’s perspective on social and what that means to Networked Insights here. Check out the graphic, explore the space, and get in touch if you have any questions or want to learn more at hello@networkedinsights.com or www.networkedinsights.com. Networked Insights and the Social Space Infographic

Keep the definitions handy, download the full report here: 

 

 
0

Blog


Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: C is confusion, concern and a luxury brand now by another name).

Loyalists Up in Arms

Sadness, anger, pride, confusion, and love—one brand and so many emotions.



Coach, a luxury fashion brand, announced its corporate name change to Tapestry on Wednesday. It’s a move that caused a flurry of social media commentary, each post offering a little more clarity or opinion than the last.

Using Kairos, we discovered which emotions were most present in the conversations around the brand name change, and why.

Turns out, Coach brand loyalists aren’t pleased. Sadness and anger held the highest share of the voice, our research found even though the iconic “C” is here to stay.

Sadness, which includes being upset, disliking and disappointment in its category determined by Networked Insights, carried the most weight in the conversation about Coach. The 76-year old iconic brand added Kate Spade to its respected collection of designers, which also includes Stuart Weitzman.



Last year, Coach purchased Stuart Weitzman, and recently acquired Kate Spade, too. The brand has said they changed the corporate name of their company to represent their new direction.

As Victor Luis, chief executive told the New York Times:

“We searched for a name to reflect these values while also expressing the cultural diversity of our people and our brands for today and tomorrow,” Luis said. “In Tapestry, we found a name that speaks to creativity, craftsmanship, authenticity and inclusivity on a shared platform and values. As such, we believe that Tapestry can grow with our portfolio and with our current brands as they extend into new categories and markets.”

But that didn’t mean shoppers were going to accept it. Some stated they felt the name wasn’t strong enough to represent the brand they love.

“Tapestry is a terrible name. Sounds like something you’d find at Hallmark Gold Crown store right next to (shudder) Vera Bradley,” one Twitter user wrote, causing a flurry of shares and retweets.



Andrea Wasserman, a respected executive in the retail industry of Nordstrom fame, wanted a better reason for the name change since the Coach brand is so well loved.



Finally, others were concerned their collection of “C” adorned purses, shoes and clothing would suddenly lose value. Fair considering the stock name change and unaccepted announcement caused the brand’s listed shares dropped 3 percent, knocking $320 million off its market value.

Despite the virtual brand-focused vitriol, some came out to clarify that the beloved “C” logo isn’t going away.



Also, they pointed out that even though the corporate name will be Tapestry, it will not impact the designs of their now three brands – Coach, Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman. That said, what this will all mean once it hits market at the end of the month, time can only tell.

To learn more about how you can also explore conversations about brands, get in touch with Networked Insights at: networkedinsights.com
0