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Networked Insights Note: This is the first report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The fluidity of audience opinion has never been more apparent than when we consider their feelings toward North Korea.

For the first time in at least three months, audience opinion about the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is 60 percent positive; it was 60 percent negative just before the winter games began.

It’s a dramatic shift that audiences believe to be owed almost entirely to the Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un’s actions during the first few days of the PyeongChang Games. Instead of nuclear war, conversations focused on the efforts toward reconciliation.

Winter Olympics 2018 Emotions Shift - Networked Insights


Methodology + Results

Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we analyzed more than 9 million conversations around North Korea that occurred during the last three months. Of those conversations, almost 60 percent of the audience felt negative about the country, with stressful topics, like nuclear war and nuclear threats being discussed in 17 percent of conversations.

Networked Insights Kairos Emotions Search on North Korea

But when Networked Insights isolated the conversations to opening day to February 13, Kairos pulled up more than 1.5 million conversations, and nearly 60 percent of the audience felt positive about North Korea and the Olympics. And instead of stress, 17 percent of the conversations mentioned keywords relating to pride.

Networked Insights Kairos Emotions Search on North Korea, positive
 

This incredible shift in conversation, Networked Insights found, is mostly because of the DPRK’s recent actions.

When former Supreme Leader Kim Jong Il’s only sister, Kim Yo Jong, arrived at the PyeongChang Games straight from Pyongyang and proudly stood behind U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, audiences understood the act to be a sign that warmer relations are on the horizon, at least from the DPRK.

Without speaking, Kim Yo Jong momentarily arrested the power of an athletic gold-medal win. With only a flash of a smile, she completely shifted entrenched opinions of a country riddled with innumerable human rights violations. With only a brief visit to her rival city, standing behind her U.S. adversary, she conveyed the only message DPRK wanted to be heard: we come in peace; you don’t.

As messages of reconciliation and peace dominated the weekend’s visit, Pence remained seated during the opening ceremonies, and audiences spoke out.

Networked Insights sample tweets about DPRK peace talk and reunification

The move aligned with Pence’s no-nonsense approach toward the DPRK, but the choice interfered with the US-backed South Korea’s ultimate desire for reunification and improving inter-Korean relations. Pence also didn’t attend a pre-opening ceremony dinner, where both Moon and Kim were in attendancefurther driving the point that the U.S. is not backing down, to the chagrin of South Koreans.

Audiences caught-on to the should-be Olympic sport of political charades and most didn’t support, however, there were plenty (more than 40 percent) who were vocal about the “obvious attempts at propaganda.”


One Tweeter wrote, “The media praising North Korea and their Olympic appearance is sickening. You’re essentially saying you support Kim Jong-Un (sic) and his regime.” 

Another, like Jake Tapper, took the moment to re-educate the supportive public about the crimes against humanity.

Negative audience conversations about DPRK and the Olympics

Even so, just as the North Korean cheerleaders ignited shock and awe as they rallied with bright smiles throughout the first-ever joint North and South Korean women’s hockey team, Kim Jong Un’s choices were a win for attention.


For more research like this or to understand other ways that Networked Insights can provide data and analysis for you or your brand, get in touch at networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com. 

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Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: C is confusion, concern and a luxury brand now by another name).

Loyalists Up in Arms

Sadness, anger, pride, confusion, and love—one brand and so many emotions.



Coach, a luxury fashion brand, announced its corporate name change to Tapestry on Wednesday. It’s a move that caused a flurry of social media commentary, each post offering a little more clarity or opinion than the last.

Using Kairos, we discovered which emotions were most present in the conversations around the brand name change, and why.

Turns out, Coach brand loyalists aren’t pleased. Sadness and anger held the highest share of the voice, our research found even though the iconic “C” is here to stay.

Sadness, which includes being upset, disliking and disappointment in its category determined by Networked Insights, carried the most weight in the conversation about Coach. The 76-year old iconic brand added Kate Spade to its respected collection of designers, which also includes Stuart Weitzman.



Last year, Coach purchased Stuart Weitzman, and recently acquired Kate Spade, too. The brand has said they changed the corporate name of their company to represent their new direction.

As Victor Luis, chief executive told the New York Times:

“We searched for a name to reflect these values while also expressing the cultural diversity of our people and our brands for today and tomorrow,” Luis said. “In Tapestry, we found a name that speaks to creativity, craftsmanship, authenticity and inclusivity on a shared platform and values. As such, we believe that Tapestry can grow with our portfolio and with our current brands as they extend into new categories and markets.”

But that didn’t mean shoppers were going to accept it. Some stated they felt the name wasn’t strong enough to represent the brand they love.

“Tapestry is a terrible name. Sounds like something you’d find at Hallmark Gold Crown store right next to (shudder) Vera Bradley,” one Twitter user wrote, causing a flurry of shares and retweets.



Andrea Wasserman, a respected executive in the retail industry of Nordstrom fame, wanted a better reason for the name change since the Coach brand is so well loved.



Finally, others were concerned their collection of “C” adorned purses, shoes and clothing would suddenly lose value. Fair considering the stock name change and unaccepted announcement caused the brand’s listed shares dropped 3 percent, knocking $320 million off its market value.

Despite the virtual brand-focused vitriol, some came out to clarify that the beloved “C” logo isn’t going away.



Also, they pointed out that even though the corporate name will be Tapestry, it will not impact the designs of their now three brands – Coach, Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman. That said, what this will all mean once it hits market at the end of the month, time can only tell.

To learn more about how you can also explore conversations about brands, get in touch with Networked Insights at: networkedinsights.com
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Blog
One year ago around Halloween, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of AmericaÆ posted a cute video on Facebook about Halloween costumes that increased their social content engagement by a staggering 655 percent.

By employing a powerful digital strategy shaped by insights based on social conversations, they were able to identify the right audience for their brand (DIY Parents), the right content for that audience (Halloween costumes), and exactly the right time for them to consume it.

Guardian Head of Corporate Digital & Social Mari Pagliughi sat down for a fireside chat with Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely at the Argyle Digital Marketing Forum in NYC last year to help explain why the campaign was such a success.

Halloween is fast approaching, so we thought we’d share some of what we learned about how Guardian drove spooktacular results with this campaign.


The Challenge: Connecting With the Right Audience

Guardian began this campaign in an attempt to grow their social community and increase their audience engagement.

“We wanted to get closer to the needs, wants and desires of the working American, and really bring to bear whatís in the hearts and minds of our consumers and align that with our content,” said Pagliughi.

They had been successfully creating valuable content, but they wanted to garner more engagement with their video content.

Knowing they wanted to go outside the traditional insurance content strategy, they used Networked Insights technology to help optimize their content campaigns, to better understand what their audiences were talking about beyond just products and brands.


The Solution: Insights Based on Social Conversations

Using Networked Insights powerful audience analytics engine Kairos, they found out that parents love DIY crafts involving their kids, and that Halloween not only elicits the year-long-dormant-creative spark in youthful party-goers but in moms of young children, too.

After understanding the audience (parents), and the type of content (DIY crafts), the final key element they needed to know was when exactly they should post the video to provide the best opportunity for engagement.

Analyzing conversation trends, they identified that a lot of the do-it-yourself type content was happening around Halloween.

Digging deeper, they were able to pinpoint the exact day that conversations peaked for DIY crafts with parents and children, which was Oct. 3. With just a few weeks shy of the holiday, parents have enough time to create unique and adorable costumes, like the gumball machine shown in the video below.  

The Results: BubbleGum Baby FTW

When they posted the short video, complete with the items needed for the costume, how to make it, and the full outfit was worn by a baby, the post surpassed usual engagement numbers compared to previous posts Guardian had shared.

“We found there was a real need to be relevant and engaging in real-time and be responsive to what consumers are thinking about,” said Pagliughi.

Within the first three days, the video garnered 40,000 views. This post got more than 1,000 engagements, 655 percent higher than their previous video post. In total, the post was shared hundreds of times, which validates how engaging the content was. Additionally, itís rare for people on social media to be polite and kind to each other, and on this post, almost all of the comments were positive.

“We were super excited to see that there was actual real engagement going on,” said Pagliughi. “We had digital eyeballs we would never have had.”

If you want to hear the fireside chat with Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely and Guardian Head of Digital Communications Mari Pagliughi, click below:


Take a look at the video and share your thoughts with us using #NIGumball. To learn more about Networked Insights and how to leverage a similar process to increase engagement, head to www.networkedinsights

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