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Networked Insights Note: This is the second report in a new series Networked Insights is developing about the Olympics. We will continue to monitor top stories and provide data and analysis throughout the PyeongChang games, will and round our coverage with a research report answering the question: What is the impact of the Olympics? 


The Olympics didn’t just take the gold, but they smoked NYFW when it came to audience attention.

 

Networked Insights found that the premier fashion event of the year was no match for the premier sporting event of the year. In fact,  only approximately 7 percent of the Olympics conversation. And that’s even after NYFW leveraged the use of celebrity influencers.


Using Kairos, Networked Insights’ audience intelligence platform, we explored conversations around New York Fashion Week. Both the Olympics and  NYFW were running concurrently, so the time frame for the search was isolated to Feb. 9 to Feb. 16. In total, there were 310,000 conversations around New York Fashion Week but during the same time frame, there have been more than 4 million conversations around the Olympics.


We were able to isolate the trend drivers for NYFW conversation. The volume incrementally increased, and most notably spiked on February 13, with 74,000 conversations primarily because of these four drivers:


    1. Christian Siriano

    2. Victoria Beckham

    3.  Celebrity Influencers, most notably Kehlani

    4. Cardi B

Key points to notice are three of the four drivers are celebrities who aren’t entirely related to fashion, like designer Christian Siriano. In fact, three are singers and fashion is secondary, though it could be argued that Victoria Beckham is more of a fashion icon these days than anything else.


Typically these three female celebrities are able to reach more than 300,000 people in a single Tweet collectively, and yet their power was no match for the Olympics. So even with the support of celebrity influencers, the luxury event of the year did not drive much engagement when compared to the premier sporting event of the year.

Possible Explanation

 

The audiences for both of these events differ, quite significantly.

 

For the Olympics, the audience is 51 percent male. They share a nearly 3 times greater affinity for the Olympics than the general consumer with the highest affinity for speed skating at 2.78 times the general consumer.

 

Additionally, the Olympics audience shares an interest in business and finance, they’re generally politically active and could be retirees who are also tech enthusiasts. So to reach the Olympics audience, it’s best to also include topics and content that also appeals to these groups of audiences.

 

Now for the NYFW, the audiences are 59 percent female. They share an affinity for fashion shows that is nearly 6 times that of the general consumer. They also share an affinity for film festivals, cosmetic brands, clothing, models and finally when it comes to sports – only tennis.

 

The NYFW audience is composed mostly of fashionistas or millennials or those who fit into Gen Z. Clearly, these audiences are very different from the Olympics. In fact, the Olympics doesn’t even rank on their interests and the closest athletic event that engages this audience is tennis, not a winter sport.

Finally, we found that even though the engagement volume differed, the overall audience feeling toward both the Olympics and New York Fashion Week was positive.

For an opportunity to discover insights like this, get in touch with us at www.networkedinsights.com or hello@networkedinsights.com.

 

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Blog


Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what we’re talking about this week (hint: C is confusion, concern and a luxury brand now by another name).

Loyalists Up in Arms

Sadness, anger, pride, confusion, and love—one brand and so many emotions.



Coach, a luxury fashion brand, announced its corporate name change to Tapestry on Wednesday. It’s a move that caused a flurry of social media commentary, each post offering a little more clarity or opinion than the last.

Using Kairos, we discovered which emotions were most present in the conversations around the brand name change, and why.

Turns out, Coach brand loyalists aren’t pleased. Sadness and anger held the highest share of the voice, our research found even though the iconic “C” is here to stay.

Sadness, which includes being upset, disliking and disappointment in its category determined by Networked Insights, carried the most weight in the conversation about Coach. The 76-year old iconic brand added Kate Spade to its respected collection of designers, which also includes Stuart Weitzman.



Last year, Coach purchased Stuart Weitzman, and recently acquired Kate Spade, too. The brand has said they changed the corporate name of their company to represent their new direction.

As Victor Luis, chief executive told the New York Times:

“We searched for a name to reflect these values while also expressing the cultural diversity of our people and our brands for today and tomorrow,” Luis said. “In Tapestry, we found a name that speaks to creativity, craftsmanship, authenticity and inclusivity on a shared platform and values. As such, we believe that Tapestry can grow with our portfolio and with our current brands as they extend into new categories and markets.”

But that didn’t mean shoppers were going to accept it. Some stated they felt the name wasn’t strong enough to represent the brand they love.

“Tapestry is a terrible name. Sounds like something you’d find at Hallmark Gold Crown store right next to (shudder) Vera Bradley,” one Twitter user wrote, causing a flurry of shares and retweets.



Andrea Wasserman, a respected executive in the retail industry of Nordstrom fame, wanted a better reason for the name change since the Coach brand is so well loved.



Finally, others were concerned their collection of “C” adorned purses, shoes and clothing would suddenly lose value. Fair considering the stock name change and unaccepted announcement caused the brand’s listed shares dropped 3 percent, knocking $320 million off its market value.

Despite the virtual brand-focused vitriol, some came out to clarify that the beloved “C” logo isn’t going away.



Also, they pointed out that even though the corporate name will be Tapestry, it will not impact the designs of their now three brands – Coach, Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman. That said, what this will all mean once it hits market at the end of the month, time can only tell.

To learn more about how you can also explore conversations about brands, get in touch with Networked Insights at: networkedinsights.com
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Blog
Each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what weíre talking about this week (hint: it rhymes with schmillenials).

Audiences Networked Insights Style

Depending on the audience we are seeking, our methodology varies. However, for the week ending on the 29th, we explored conversations that the love-to-hate-hate-to-love-group-blamed-for-killing-everything, the rosy-colored-educated-and-lazy millennials.

To determine who fits within this audience, we classified people who self-identified in social conversations or in their bios as millennials.

It may sound simple, but scanning and classifying millions of conversations and millions of profiles is a significant task that our artificial intelligence engine Kairos completes in mere seconds (thankfully).

What’s grinding their gears this week?

Millennials sure have had a lot to say! They’ve shared more than 5.2 million posts across all social platforms, surpassing all other groups in our 20-plus syndicated audience list.

That means they’ve had, 2 million more convos than moms; double the number of convos that dads had and nearly 3 million more online convos than affluent professionals.

So if you’re trying to get ahold of an 80s-born-90s-raised kid? Our data says get online.





When they shared 5 million conversations, 21 percent of them held positive sentiments and 16 percent held negative sentiments. Looking into how they felt about the topics they discussed, 17 percent of their posts are about things they desire or want and 13 percent of people they love. So, overall they’re a chatty and happy bunch.

Specifically, they discussed sports brands more than anything else, which could be indicative of a knowledge in pop culture and current events. Of the 5.2 million posts, 30 percent were related to the NFL, 8 percent related to the NBA and 6 percent related to MLB.


Within such topics, their conversations jumped around from excitement of certain games coming up, to rants about their favorite athletesí political opinions, which have been making headlines recently.

Professional athletes are spanning more than the sports section because of the #takeaknee/#taketheknee and #boycottnfl/#nflboycott movements and millennials are claiming a significant share of the conversation, regardless of what side of the argument they’re on. We explored this topic here: #TakeAKnee and the Impact of Boycotting Brands.

So what else do Millennials care about?

Using audience.ai, we’re able to step out of the conversation and examine the audience holistically. Studying their conversations as a whole and not per topic, we have created a profile with details about their engagements and preferences and interests. We found that for millennials, music tops the charts.


Specifically, they prefer roots and rock music 1.43 times more than the general consumer. These include artists like, Dawes, Joan Osborne (we’re surprised, too) and Kid Rock.

However, for the greatest unique group of millennials, conversations are mostly about Alternative/Indie Pop Musicians.

Specifically, artists like, She & Him, Christopher Owens, The Metropole, Orkest, Broods and Relient K are driving significant volumes of conversations.

Finally, their third most valued interest is entertainment web brands like Edjing, Fandango, and Vevo.

For more information about millennials and their interests, check out www.networkedinsights.com.

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