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Insights and Infographics, Reports & Guides
Understanding social is hard. It’s really that simple. Even analytics organizations who make it their business, literally, to understand what companies within the space can offer brands or marketers, struggle with drawing the lines. In fact, respected analytics organizations, like Forrester, weren’t able to place Networked Insights in a way that was all-encompassing. Perhaps that’s due to the rapid pace Networked Insights is developing and releasing new products and capabilities. After all, shifting a model built for consulting to SaaS is not an easy feat. Or maybe it’s just as simple as accepting that the space is complicated and needs a regular, high-level reset to ensure we’re all speaking the same language. So, to demystify the social space, to better understand where Networked Insights fits within the space and to demonstrate how this applies to brands and marketers, we’ve created the ultimate atlas of the terminology used when speaking about the social sphere. The fifteen common terms as we think about them at Networked Insights are detailed below.  Check it out and get in touch if you see a way we can help you: www.networkedinsights.com. SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING The practice of using social technology platforms to track, gather and mine the information and data of certain individuals or groups (like, companies or organizations), to assess their reputation and discern how they are perceived online and then react to it. This requires you to know what to look for while searching. This is the most common way companies offer reputation management for brands or clients.  SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING TOOL Industry recognized platform that provides monitoring of owned and earned engagement around brand and/or campaigns while also providing analytics,  monitoring, listening and/or intelligence for the user.  SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING  The practice of using a social technology platform to proactively discover what is being said in online, or social, conversations about you, your competitors or your brand in an effort to learn, question, explore and derive insights. This also requires you to know what to look for while searching. SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING TOOL A platform that provides the ability to collect online conversations based upon user-specified terms. The tool is also able to provide some degree of contextual information through the analytics of those conversations.  SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYTICS The approach of collecting data from social sources and evaluating the data to make business decisions. The process steps beyond basic tracking like, retweets or “likes” to develop an in-depth, holistic understanding of the content resonating with consumers.  SOCIAL MEDIA INTELLIGENCE The collective tools and solutions that allow organizations to monitor/listen to social channels and conversations, respond to social signals and synthesize social data points into meaningful trends and analysis based upon the user’s needs. Intelligence can be gathered from both intrusive and non-intrusive means, like open and closed social networks (Wikipedia).  SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT The monitoring, planning and organizing of social content for publishing and analysis. This includes owned and earned social media that focus on engaging consumers, building an online presence and/or reputation management. ENGAGEMENT  The process of interacting with and researching social media users to achieve set goals including, brand management, brand recognition, customer service, support or sales. INFLUENCER A social media user who carries a lot of social clout since his/her opinions can affect the perceptions of a brand and/or subject. Oftentimes influencers are ranked on their ability to cause an impact, like their follower count or the degree of which their statements are being read/shared/valued. SENTIMENT ANALYSIS  Sentiment scoring is the industry standard way that social intelligence companies measure overall positivity or negativity of conversation. By weighting keywords as positive or negative, the overall score of a post is calculated. INSIGHTS (ACTIONABLE INSIGHTS) Taking raw data and making it actionable in order to help brands/marketers make more strategic decisions. CUSTOMER INTELLIGENCE  The qualitative and quantitative insights about consumers.  POTENTIAL REACH  The number of monthly active  people on social platforms, both networking and engagement that matches  the audience you defined through your audience targeting selections. SOCIAL MEDIA AUDIENCE SEGMENTATION  The process of organizing audiences using public social data to derive insights and set for for targeting purposes. EMOTIONS Essentially, sentiment is black-and-white, but Networked Insights’ unique classification system allows us to measure each post, tweet and comment against a full range of emotional classifiers (46 to be exact). This allows marketers to see the full spectrum of consumers’ emotional responses to their brands, campaigns and various marketing efforts. BONUS GRAPHIC: THE SOCIAL SPACE + NETWORKED INSIGHTS Prefer visuals? So do we. Now that we’ve broken down the definitions, get to know how Networked Insights compares to the other major players in the space. One of the unique differentiators of NI is the ability to use social and non-social data for both analytics and targeting or activation. The other is simply in the methodology and mindset we use when creating products, which is best summed up by Networked Insights CEO Dan Neely: “We are about people and what’s important to them in their lives, versus posts, which is understanding what’s important to you in your search.” Read more about our CEO’s perspective on social and what that means to Networked Insights here. Check out the graphic, explore the space, and get in touch if you have any questions or want to learn more at hello@networkedinsights.com or www.networkedinsights.com. Networked Insights and the Social Space Infographic

Keep the definitions handy, download the full report here: 

 

 
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Blog


Welcome to Weekly Conversations, where each week we will dig into a hot topic dominating social conversations and explore what matters to major audiences and influencers, using our audience intelligence engine Kairos and our audience marketing platform audience.ai to instantly gather insights from billions of real-time data points.

Read on to find out what weíre talking about this week (hint: Goonies meets Stand By Me by another name is a sci-fi Netflix show).

Livin’ up to the Hype

Only a show that is simultaneously edgy, yet nostalgic would drum up more than 3 million posts in one week. Thatís right, weíre talking about Stranger Things on Netflix and the impact of its much anticipated season 2 release.

So, take a deep breath and bring your towel, weíre taking a trip to the Upside Down.

A year later, the binge-worthy sci-fi treat came out and stole the online conversation, for at least a week. Critics and fans alike hailed the new season as pretty close to perfect. Others expressed some concerns binge-ing a show flies through. However, the online conversations we analyzed showed that many were blown away by the more cinematic approach and the deeper character development the second season offered.

Of the 3 million posts, more than 400,000 of them were indexed by emotions, and we found that fans were equally loving and stressed by the storyline in the new season and the off-set gossip about the actors.


The posts that contained commentary spiking the emotion love, demonstrated just how much fans are emotionally involved with the storyline.

Fans shared how much they enjoyed the new relationships in the season, like the bond between Eleven, played by Millie Bobby Brown and Jim Hopper, played by David Harbour. They also talked about the roller coaster of emotions Winona Ryder’s character, Joyce Byers endures to save her son again.

However, it was clear that for as much as they loved the show, viewers were almost just as stressed. Even launching Winona Ryder beyond just meme phase and into a colloquial expression about stress:


Analyzing the posts, their conversations between stress and love vacillated more than the camera angles from reality to the upside down. Beyond concern for the characters within the storyline, fans latched onto the salacious story about Charlie Heaton, who plays Winona Ryder’s son in the show, being caught with cocaine, which inevitably caused a spike in conversation quantity and topic.

That’s crazy, but who are these fans?

Analyzing the posts, many of the conversations were written by women (61 percent) and were about skipping class to watch, or being too tired in class the next day because of a night full of bingeing.


So, we can infer that female students were the most interested in the show. More specifically, using audience.ai, we were able to nail down just which group of females were warming up some Eggos and plopping themselves in front of a streaming device.


We discovered that it was the Gen Z group who were the most engaged. In fact, they demonstrated an interest 2.44 times greater than the general consumer. The closest group following them were millennials, who demonstrated an affinity for the show, 1.36 times greater than the general consumer.


To discover more insights about the audiences engaging with the Stranger Things or on another topic, get in touch with Networked Insights, www.networkedinsights.com.

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Uncategorized
Dudes donning President Trump gear while munching on Reese’s, that was Halloween 2017 in a nutshell. Using the analytics engine Kairos, Networked Insights discovered the specific brands, celebrities and conversation topics that dominated Halloween this year and last year. Most surprising, the holiday isn’t just for kids—women actually dominate within the social sphere. And perhaps unsurprisingly, political costumes remained in the top five. Here’s what else Networked Insights found out: Last year, women were 1.38 times more likely to talk about Halloween costumes than men. They also represented 58 percent of all conversations about the candy-coated holiday. However this year, women had just 55 percent of all conversations about Halloween while men had about 45 percent. That means women wrote more than 200,000 more Halloween-related posts than men this year. And what were they talking about? Their makeup and the excitement about their costumes, specifically Cleopatra this year (and Harley Quinn last year). The popularity for President Trump may be waning in reality, but it was winning during Halloween.   Men, like last year, dressed up as The Don—moving President Trump from the second most popular costume in 2016, for men, to first place this year. But the the greatest upset from last year to this year was in candy. From reigning champion in 2016 to last place in 2017, Twix made the biggest move. Dropping to fifth most popular candy, by huge margins, Reese’s pulled to the top after being in second place last year. It is possible this upset is not directly related to a preference of peanut butter over caramel, but rather to a false rumor about the makers of Reese’s discontinuing the candy. Finally, for kids, Elsa remains a common costume choice despite its 2013 release. Check out the infographics for more: To learn more about Networked Insights, check out: www.networkedinsights.com.
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Blog
Dudes donning President Trump gear while munching on Reese’s, that was Halloween 2017 in a nutshell.

Using the analytics engine Kairos, Networked Insights discovered the specific brands, celebrities and conversation topics that dominated Halloween this year and last year. Most surprising, the holiday isn’t just for kids, women actually dominate within the social sphere. And perhaps unsurprisingly, political costumes remained in the top five.

Here’s what else Networked Insights found out:

Last year, women were 1.38 times more likely to talk about Halloween costumes than men. They also represented 58 percent of all conversations about the candy-coated holiday. However this year, women had just 55 percent of all conversations about Halloween while men had about 45 percent. That means women wrote more than 200,000 more Halloween-related posts than men this year.

And what were they talking about? Their makeup and the excitement about their costumes, specifically Cleopatra this year (and Harley Quinn last year).

The popularity for President Trump may be waning in reality, but it was winning during Halloween. Men, like last year, dressed up as The Don, moving President Trump from the second most popular costume in 2016, for men, to first place this year.

But the greatest upset from last year to this year was in candy.

From reigning champion in 2016 to the last place in 2017, Twix made the biggest move. Dropping to fifth most popular candy, by huge margins, Reese’s pulled to the top after being in second place last year. It is possible this upset is not directly related to a preference of peanut butter over caramel, but rather to a false rumor about the makers of Reese’s discontinuing the candy.

Finally, for kids, Elsa remains a common costume choice despite its 2013 release.

Check out the infographics for more:


To learn more about Networked Insights, check out: www.networkedinsights.com.
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